How to Operate Your Small Business for Maximum Efficiency and Profitability


As far as I am concerned, one of the primary reasons the washout rate for small business owners is so high is because too many investors fail to place enough emphasis on getting the maximum return on every dollar and hour that they put into their small business. Instead, they seem to be more concerned about frivolous stuff like the color of their business cards. In any small business endeavor, a lack of focus, coupled with the inability to prioritize tasks, is a recipe for failure. So, too, is the type of complacency that breeds an “if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it” mentality, which usually results in a stagnant business that’s barely able to keep its head above water. That’s why to my way of thinking, the catch-phrase “easier, faster, and cheaper” should be the mantra of every real estate investor in America. I say this because I’ve learned the hard way that for me to consistently achieve the highest possible rate of return on the money and time that I invest in my business, small business CRM I must continually analyze, refine, and tweak every aspect of my operation, to make it easier, faster, and cheaper to run. Nowadays, I think of my business as a high performance automobile engine, which must be finely turned and calibrated to run at its optimum speed and maximum efficiency. I can tell you from experience that in order to operate a small business at maximum efficiency and profitability, it takes:

1. Personal and financial discipline.

2. Organizational skills.

3. Management know-how.

4. Meticulous planning and attention to detail.

5. Prioritization of tasks according to their profit potential.

6. Maximum use of available technology.

7. Accurate record keeping.

8. Maximum use of all the tax benefits that are available to small business owners.

It Takes Discipline to Operate a Business at Maximum Efficiency and Profitability

It takes a combination of personal and financial discipline to operate a small business at maximum efficiency and profitability. First, you need to have the initiative and self-discipline that’s required to be successfully self-employed. You must work smart, so you don’t waste your valuable time doing grunt-type tasks that can be hired out. In other words, Soniqboom don’t spend your time cleaning up trash around your office when you should be out searching for customers. Second, you need to possess the financial discipline that’s necessary to operate your small business at maximum profitability. The only way that you’re ever going to be able to keep your spending under control is by:

1. Adopting a bottom-line mentality that’s totally focused on maximizing the profitability of your business.

2. Operating your business on a bare-bones budget by buying all equipment, supplies, and services at the lowest available prices in your area.

3. Keeping close track of operating expenses by carefully reviewing all invoices for errors, overcharges, and bogus charges.

Prioritize Tasks according to Their Profit Potential

The number one question that you must continually ask yourself when you’re working in your small business is: Is what I am doing right this minute the most profitable use of my time? A lot of people fail as small business owners simply because they’re never able to prioritize tasks according to their profit potential. They end up never making a profit because they couldn’t distinguish between what’s important and what’s trivial. As a general rule of thumb, I consider any business function that doesn’t contribute directly to my bottom line to be low priority and best left for after business hours. In other words, if the task at hand isn’t part of the process of completing a real estate transaction that will eventually end with me going to the bank; I put it off until later in the day.

Avoid Reinventing the Wheel Every Time You Need to Complete a routine Task

Whatever you do, don’t fall into the trap of reinventing the wheel every time you need to complete a routine task. The term, reinventing the wheel, refers to re-creating something from scratch. An example of reinventing the wheel would be retyping standard documents, such as purchase agreements, over and over again, instead of storing them in a Microsoft Word document file where they can be printed out as needed. The point here is to work smart by making your operating as streamlined as humanly possible.

Operate Your Small Business on a Bare-Bones Budget

One surefire way to fail as a small business owner is to run your operation in a slipshod manner with no financial controls in place to keep your operating costs from going through the roof.

Do a Cost-Benefit Analysis before You Make a Purchase

I suggest that you do what I always do, before I ever part with any of my hard-earned money, and ask yourself this very poignant question: How exactly is this-(fill-in-the-blank)–going to have a direct impact on the profitability of my business? Unless you can justify to yourself why the purchase under consideration will immediately contribute to your bottom line, you should hold onto your money. This type of decision-making process is referred to in business schools as “cost-benefit analysis,” which means that if the cost outweighs the benefit that’ll be gained from purchasing an item, it shouldn’t be bought. Keep this in mind the next time that you get the urge to splurge.

What You Should Have When You Set Up Shop as a Small Business Owner

I am willing to concede that an owner could possibly run their small business without any of the basic amenities of a modern high-tech office at their disposal. However, it would be a very inefficient operation, and I am willing to bet that most small business owners, in this type of work environment, would end up spending much of their time performing tedious tasks such as retyping the same documents over and over again. I don’t know about you, but I’ve never met anyone who has typed their way to a fortune as a small business owner. As far as I am concerned, every neophyte small business owner, who’s really serious about consistently making money in their small business, should have the following six items when they set up shop:

1. Telephone service and a prepaid telephone calling card to make calls on the road from pay phones.

2. Personal computer with Microsoft Windows operating system.

3. Microsoft Word software.

4. Internet connection.

5. Black-and-while laser or inkjet printer.

6. Financial calculator.

It’s Hard to Succeed in a Digital World Using Horse-and-Buggy Technology

Computer technology is here to stay, and, if you want to make it as a successful small business owner in today’s digital world, you had better embrace the latest technology and learn how to use it to your advantage. So if you happen to be computer illiterate, the very best advice that I can give you is to buy an inexpensive personal computer (PC) and then jump in with both feet and learn how to use it. If someone with a nontechnical background like me can use a computer, anyone can.

What It Takes to Run a Small Business at Maximum Efficiency

According to the Small Business Administration (SBA), 80 percent of all new small businesses fail within five years of opening their doors. More often than not, the cause of failure can be directly attributed to an appalling lack of organization and planning on the part of business owners. I hate to come across as some sort of killjoy, but you just can’t throw a business together without any organization and planning and expect it to be an efficient operation. It takes meticulous planning and attention to detail to set up a small business so that it operates at maximum efficiency. The only way that you’re ever going to have a smooth running business is by doing the little things right, such as:

1. Maintaining a master to-do checklist to run your business.

2. Computerizing all business documents and records.

3. Setting up your business so you avoid re-creating anything from scratch.

4. Organizing your office so that everything you need is available at your fingertips.

Use a Master To-Do Checklist to Run Your Business

To keep your business operating at maximum efficiency, I recommend that you do what I’ve done for the past 20 plus years, and maintain a master to-do checklist. I keep my checklist on my computer in a Microsoft Word file. It serves as a combination checklist and appointment calendar. For example, each entry that I make on my checklist, lists the task or appointment along with the completion or meeting date. This way, nothing slips through the crack and tasks are completed on time and appointments are kept.


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